If you know us, then you know that Minca does not rest. We work, we create, we plan, we travel, we bring people together and we also teach. It may come as no surprise to you that we are entirely devoted to social enterprises and to spreading the message while we’re at it. No idea what we’re on about?

We’ve paired up with Future Learn to bring you an online free Social Enterprise Course. Ever wondered what it takes to launch and run a sustainable social enterprise, or how to turn a simple idea into action? We’ve created the perfect, flexible program for you to learn more about the diverse world of social enterprise.

The Social Enterprise program that consists of three online courses has been done in collaboration with Middlesex University Business School and the Jindal Centre for Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship in New Delhi and funded by the British Council. If you’re a student, entrepreneur, charity, working professional or simply interested in what you can do for the greater good, then you’ve come to the right place. By the end of the course you will be able to evaluate your social enterprise idea, design its model and apply it to the market, assess sources of funding and measure impact. What is more, you will understand the legal and marketing considerations and how to successfully grow a sustainable business.

As you’ve probably figured out, this course is a must for anyone who wants to understand how to scale and sustain a social enterprise – not an easy job without the knowledge and support. That’s why we developed an approachable, easy to follow and valuable information-packed course; it includes a mix of theory, practical information and case studies from all around the globe that Living in Minca has visited and worked with to guide you on the path to changing the world step-by-step. You can also maximise your learning by engaging with other learners to touch on key concepts and ideas.

The course will be accessible for free on desktop, tablet or mobile and by tuning in to us and to many experts and practitioners worldwide, you will develop your own set of social enterprise skills. So look no further. We’ve got you covered.

Here is the link for the Social Enterprise Programme:
https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/social-enterprise

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Anderson’s work claims that as no one can know all of the people within a nation and its unity is therefore assumed or imagined: “imagined communities”. Rwanda is for sure a really interesting case study to look at from any of its inner dimensions. The fact that the unimaginable has happened (Rwanda’s unity) proves that the transition from the imagination to reality can be possible and beyond the utopic idea that the genocide will be forgotten; Rwanda presents an unique example of collective pardon. Although, nobody truly knows whether or not the apparent national piece will sustain, the country seems to move forward and somehow Rwanda has managed to live harmoniously by leaving the past to history.

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Undoubtedly there is a big tendency to find ‘non-chosen’ Africa’s ambassadors and speakers around the globe, particularly form the west; Even, there is a common factor in the global discourse to batch all African countries in one. Of course, there is nothing wrong to be willing to help the “poor Africa” and most of the intentions behind it are the best indisputably. But, isn’t also a valid right to question the fact that behind this extensive aid throughout these years have had its own either political or socio-economic agenda?

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We met Paul Talliard at a Gala Dinner in Cape Town. It was an encounter of UK/South African academics with social entrepreneurs. The event was organised by the University of Essex and sponsored by the British Council. We sat on the dinner table and starting talking with the people we already knew. Suddenly, We realised that someone sat close to us and we introduced ourselves. It was Paul and his lovely wife.

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The Expedition Abya Yala trip organised by Fundación Wintata happened between the 8th of January until the 7th February 2015, starting from Colombia and ending in Ecuador. The Abya Yala Expedition is a project that seeks to consider value and reclaimed the varied cultures on the continent, through visiting historically marginalised communities in the Americas (Abya Yala), including indigenous and rural communities and groups with African heritage (http://expedicionabyayala.org). Abya Yala, which in the Kuna language means, “land in its full maturity” or “land of vital blood”, is the name used by the Panamanian Kuna people to refer to the Latin American continent before the Spanish conquest.

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